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Tyler Air Quality

The Air Quality Index (AQI) is calculated using data over a 24-hour period from a Davis Air Quality Monitor. That’s because the science we have about air pollution exposure and health is based on 24 hours and, therefore, the EPA’s air quality standards are based on 24 hours. It is not valid to use shorter-term (e.g. hourly) data to calculate an AQI value. However, it is important to report shorter-term data to caution people in time for them to reduce their 24-hour exposure. The NowCast is EPA’s method for relating hourly data to the AQI.

The NowCast AQI is designed to be responsive to rapidly changing air quality conditions, such as during fires. The NowCast calculation uses longer averages during periods of stable air quality and shorter averages when air quality is changing rapidly. The NowCast allows the current air quality values to align more closely with what people are actually seeing or experiencing. This gives people information they can use to protect their health when air quality is poor – and help them get outdoors and get exercise when air quality is good.

Air Quality data collection began October 21, 2020.


10µm Particles
NowCast AQI Current AQI (24hr avg) Today's High Yesterday's High
39 22 22 at 8:30 AM 15 at 11:55 PM
High This Month Date High This Year Date All-Time High Date
22 12/05/20 26 11/28/20 26 11/28/20

2.5µm Particles
NowCast AQI Current AQI (24hr avg) Today's High Yesterday's High
nan 69 69 at 8:30 AM 56 at 11:55 PM
High This Month Date High This Year Date All-Time High Date
69 12/05/20 75 11/07/20 75 11/07/20

Air Quality Index (0-500) Who Needs to be Concerned? What Should I Do?
Good
(0-50)
It’s a great day to be active outside.
Moderate
(51-100)

Some people who may be unusually sensitive to particulate pollution.

Unusually sensitive people: Consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Watch for symptoms such as coughing or shortness of breath. These are signs to take it a little easier.

Everyone else: It’s a good day to be active outside.

Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups
(101-150)

Sensitive groups include people with heart or lung disease such as asthma, older adults, children and teenagers.

Sensitive groups: Reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Take more breaks, do less intense activities. Watch for symptoms such as coughing or shortness of breath. Schedule outdoor activities in the morning when ozone is lower.

People with asthma should follow their asthma action plans and keep quick relief medicine handy.

If you have heart disease: Symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, or unusual fatigue may indicate a serious problem. If you have any of these, contact your health care provider.

Unhealthy
(151 to 200)

Everyone

Sensitive groups: Avoid prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Move activities indoors or reschedule to a time when the air quality is better.

Everyone else: Reduce prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Take more breaks during all outdoor activities.

Very Unhealthy
(201-300)

Everyone

Sensitive groups: Avoid all physical activity outdoors. Move activities indoors or reschedule to a time when air quality is better.

Everyone else: Avoid prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion. Consider moving activities indoors or rescheduling to a time when air quality is better.

Hazardous
(301-500)

Everyone

Sensitive groups: Remain indoors and keep activity levels low. Follow tips for keeping particle levels low indoors.

Everyone: Avoid all physical activity outdoors.



PM Comparison Scale